Wednesday, 30 June 2010

Rust Never Sleeps







7 comments:

Bronislaus Janulis said...

Well, a certain focus on corruption, not to mention the most unusual thesis on equipment. I, personally think rust takes naps, as I myself have slumbered off whilst listening to my "things" rust.

Mike C. said...

It's an odd phrase, isn't it? I believe Neil Young stole it from the advert of an anti-rust paint (one of hundreds of examples of albums with unforgettable titles to which I've never knowingly listened).

I like its peculiarly two-faced conjunction of "eternal vigilance" and "what's the point?". I incline to the latter p-o-v, by nature. Put down that WD-40, it's a race you never can win...

Mike

Gavin McL said...

Steel and Iron are unusual that they do rust - most metals from a layer on the surface which protects them from further corrosion - Iron can do this in certain uncommon circumstances but normally the rust just flakes off exposing more metal to corrosion.
The fact that the most convenient and useful metal has this fatal flaw always put me in mind of some classical myth.

Bronislaus Janulis said...

As a small fan of Neil Young, I never knew about that album.

From some time spent as a youth in rural areas: "on a quiet night, you can hear a Chevy/Ford (take your pick) rust. Ahhh, simple pleasures, listening to the grass grow and your vehicle rust.

sEAN bENTLEY said...

Splendid! I confess I haven't seen rusty wood paneling quite like that before.

Dave Leeke said...

For my first foray back into blogging for a month I thought I'd be both incredibly smart-arsed and boringly pedantic. So here goes . . .

Mr Young had filmed Devo for a sequence in his film "Human Highway" and noticed in the rushes that they were chanting the phrase "rust never sleeps" over and over. When he asked them about it, they told him that they had come up with the phrase for an advert a few years before when working on an account for Rustoleum for an ad agency.

Then he wrote a song using the phrase himself which included the rather more (in)famous phrase, "it's better to burn out than fade away" which was a far more catchy jingle for lost American slacker youth . . .

Dave Leeke said...

Oh, and another thing - the last photo reminds me of the cover for "Rise Up Like The Sun" by The Albion Band.

That's a good thing.